Xfce fractional scaling

This quick guide explains how you can enable fractional scaling in Ubuntu If you are looking for a solution to enable fractional scaling in Ubuntu, you are in the right place. Fractional scaling helps you to fully utilize your HiDPI monitors, high-resolution laptops by making your desktop not too small or not too big and keep things in balance.

Although the resolution settings are there to help they sometimes are not feasible due to the operating system limitations. Ubuntu Before you enable fractional scaling, check in System Display settings how much scale option is available. In Ubuntu, open Software and search dconf editor and install. Check whether you are using X11 or Wayland. If you are confident with terminal usage, you can run below commands to achieve the same settings.

Once the settings are set, close dconf editor. Open system settings and go to the display settings. You should be seeing the different scale options. For the latest tutorials, app reviews and how-to guides, follow debugpoint on TwitterFacebookand subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Comparison of Fractional Scaling Ubuntu Turn off the Use default value option. Display Settings after Enabling To reset, you can change the values back in dconf editor; Or run below command from terminal.

Also Read. Fractional Scaling. Next Post Windows 7 Support Ended. By Arindam - Updated on April 9, How to Install Latest Java 14 in Ubuntu How to Upgrade to Ubuntu Submit Type above and press Enter to search. Press Esc to cancel.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service.

Ask Ubuntu is a question and answer site for Ubuntu users and developers. It only takes a minute to sign up. I recently installed Ubuntu This command does not change display scaling. Still looking for the perfect solution. The Archwiki proposes a solution or rather a hack with xrandr if you use standard Ubuntu A setting of 2, 3, etc. You can achieve any non-integer scale factor by using a combination of GNOME's scaling-factor and xrandr.

This combination keeps the TTF fonts properly scaled so that they do not become blurry if using xrandr alone. You specify zoom-in factor with gsettings and zoom-out factor with xrandr. Usually "2" is already too big, otherwise try "3" etc. Then start scaling down by setting zoom-out factor with xrandr. First get the relevant output name, the examples below use eDP1. Start e. If the UI is still too big, increase the scale factor; if it's too small decrease the scale factor.

Since Ubuntu To enable scaling:. Actually I like this approach, since it keeps other things at scaling 1, because I only need the text to be bigger.

xfce fractional scaling

I run a shell script on login using Startup Applications control panel to set my desired scaling. Then put an executable script somewhere I have it in my home directory containing the following:. Tried to play with expermential features and some other "tips" found online but nothing helped or seemed like "solution" will introduce another pallet of issues.

What i eventually did is - i installed unity desktop manager which was used with Ubuntu So now I have running latest 18 LTS with a bit different desktop manager which does have fractional scaling without any hacks. I used Unity Tweak Tool in Ubuntu I'm running now a test environment where The settings I'm using for scaling on a x monitor are:.

The Text scaling factor scales both fonts and UI elements like title bars, buttons, etc. Icon size is preset but the text size under it increases giving the illusion the icon size changed:. In the.Getting fractional scaling right in Xorg is tricky, but possible. The solution that works for me comes in 2 parts. There are 3 solutions to changing UI scaling in Xorg. Each one affects different things, so we'll need to combine them appropriately.

These things can either scale text ie, increase font sizes or scale UI elements ie, increase "pixels" in margins and paddings. These two things combined will make all your apps display 2x as large.

After enlarging your UI by 2x, you can use xrandr to scale it down to your desired size. Note that not all versions of Xorg might support this. For older versions, the tool xfractional-display-scaling can help.

You have just read Fractional scaling on Linux Xorgwritten on April 08, This is Today I Learneda collection of random tidbits I've learned through my day-to-day web development work. I'm Rico Sta. Cruz, rstacruz on GitHub and Twitter! Fractional scaling on Linux Xorg Rico Sta.

Cruz April 08, You can't adjust this without restarting apps. This can be adjusted on the fly, and can be applied per-display. These variables will take effect when you log in. Part 2: Scaling the display down After enlarging your UI by 2x, you can use xrandr to scale it down to your desired size.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service.

It only takes a minute to sign up. Either everything is way to large or everything is way to small. Sure, I can adjust the font and the panel sizes which is what I did for nowbut this still does not solve dozens of problems where everything is either way to big or way to small. Set your display resolution higher than maximum then use the Double UI scaling to scale it back up to a sensible size.

This is pretty much bug free, except possibly for the mouse pointer and for using external displays, both of which are fixable within settings. First, determine which display device you want to change the resolution for in this case it's eDP-1 :. Then determine the required VESA CVT for your desired resolution, remembering to choose a resolution of the same aspect ratio to your current display e.

And add that new mode to your display. The display i. Finally select that new resolution in the Display Settings and enable Double UI scaling, for a reasonably sensible experience! Note: If you want this change to be preserved on reboot you need to run the last two commands --newmode and --addmode when you login by adding them, without the sudo s, to your user profile:.

I use a script at login for my 4k screen.

How to Enable Fractional Scaling in Ubuntu 19.04

The result is far from being perfect but will do most of the time. Use xrandr to determine the display port connected as mentioned above:. Set your scaling to hidpi in the cinnamon settings scaling 2. To give a hint where the factor came from: is 1. Sign up to join this community. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top. Home Questions Tags Users Unanswered. Linux Mint Cinnamon fractional scaling 1. Ask Question.

Asked 1 year, 7 months ago. Active 4 months ago. Viewed 8k times. How could I achieve appropriate scaling? Blackbam Blackbam 1 1 silver badge 9 9 bronze badges. Active Oldest Votes. This isn't ideal - the interface scaling factor is still limited to whole numbers hence uint32 and the active display scale seems to only alter the bottom toolbar.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service.

Ask Ubuntu is a question and answer site for Ubuntu users and developers. It only takes a minute to sign up. I do have a Toshiba z20t-c with Ubuntu This doesn't happen, when there is another window in the foreground an "always-on-top" terminal, e.

I'm not entirely sure, but I think it has been working some time in the past Having same issue on popos Dirty trick is to remove everything. Ubuntu Community Ask! Sign up to join this community. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top. Home Questions Tags Users Unanswered. Asked 1 month ago.

Active 1 month ago. Viewed times. Also, KDE doesn't have this problem. Thanks in advance, pheidrias. If it happens in Hi K7AAY, thanks for your answer.

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In fact, the problem exists in ubuntu When reporting in launchpad - which package shall I report it against? It exists in I've investigated somewhat more systematically. It looks like the system is leaving the e. Systematic approach: Fresh install and upgrade of How can I dig further into this?

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xfce fractional scaling

Related 3. Hot Network Questions.So was I until I switch to a 4k monitor and realize that there's no real, stable, functional fractional scaling on Linux, even less so on XFCE, unfortunately.

I main Linux on virtually every one of my computers, and I love it. I wouldn't switch off Linux if you paid me. But this complaint is spot on. It drives me crazy that we still don't have good support for higher resolutions.

And there's nobody else to blame for that -- we've known for ages that 4K and fractional scaling was going to be a thing, just like we've known for ages that touchscreens were going to be a thing. But nope, let's just measure everything in pixels. It's like the majority of native developers on Linux all looked at responsive design on the web and thought, "I'm pretty sure that's just a fad.

And I still run into people who argue that what we should just scale the physical size of a pixel for the entire desktop by a percentage, just so we can keep building fixed layouts that absolute position all of their elements. At a certain point, it feels more like a cultural problem than a technical one. Everybody else is doing responsive design. We could be using them on Linux. Try using Linux on a laptop with an hdpi internal monitor, and a regular old external. It's a guaranteed way to generate a daily urge to throttle yourself.

GTK3 and Qt5 software works great, anything else is a pot shot. My work laptop is in this situation and it got to the point where I just ran the eDP display in p instead.

xfce fractional scaling

Honestly on a 15 in screen where I'm only doing code and not editing photos, there's no point in running it in UHD.

I dismissed this initially out of a felt need to max out the use of my hardware. But actually it does solve some problems. But given the laptop screen is further away when I'm plugged in at the desk, p is more than adequate. It also means I can go back to Xorg, which obviates some Wayland bugginess.

So thanks for the idea - it truly had never occurred to me oddly. Laptop plus external monitor works great, with auto-config on connect and other stuff. Protip: ignore "scaling". You don't need it if you use programs that actually respect your real DPI. Ballas 6 months ago.

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Thank you. I struggle to understand people that claim linux does not do hidpi. Yetanfou 6 months ago. I do care about high dpi but not in the way most people seem to mean: I want as much text as readable on a screen. One of the many reasons for not using Gnome everything is that it insists on making everything SO BIG with enormous amounts of wasted space around it.

Those x pixels on my laptop or x on the monitor are there to be used, not wasted. Firefox used to be another offender in this respect albeit one which is easier to tame - just change layout. However, this is all assuming that 2x scaling is fine for you, support for fractional scaling is not great yet.

Ubuntu From the simple boot screen runs at 1x so text is unreadable to the wierd VirtualBox tangle of bugsto the frustrating dolphin file manager, which I use to avoid UI bugs in the gnome file manager. I found workarounds for some issues, and maybe they are fixed in the next LTS, but there is no way I could recommend I find this surprising.

I'd say anyone who does any serious amount of multitasking whether a Linux dev or not would easily want one.They are mostly found in high-end laptops and monitors. Not all software behaves well in high-resolution mode yet. Here are listed most common tweaks which make work on a HiDPI screen more pleasant. Or, use gsettings:. A setting of 2, 3, etcwhich is all you can do with scaling-factormay not be ideal for certain HiDPI displays and smaller screens e.

Fractional scaling is possible on both Wayland and Xorg, though the process differs. You can achieve any non-integer scale factor by using a combination of GNOME's scaling-factor and xrandr. This combination keeps the TTF fonts properly scaled so that they do not become blurry if using xrandr alone.

You specify zoom-in factor with gsettings and zoom-out factor with xrandr. Usually "2" is already too big, otherwise try "3" etc. Then start scaling down by setting zoom-out factor with xrandr.

Manjaro 17.1.10 Hakoila: GNOME 3.28.2 – HiDPI - 3840 x 2160

First get the relevant output name, the examples below use eDP1. Start e. If the UI is still too big, increase the scale factor; if it is too small decrease the scale factor. The factual accuracy of this article or section is disputed. There is blog entry for recompiling Gnome Settings Daemon. In the source documentation there is another way mentioned to set X settings DPI:.

You can use the gsettings, just make sure to read previous setting first and merge it. In just simply set it with this command:. Alternatively, or in addition to changing the display scaling, you can separately scale text. Note that the text scaling factor need not be limited to whole integers, for example:. This should cover everything on Wayland. Note that this is a long-standing issue to which a patch has been merged and available for Gnome Shell 3.

For older releases, Xorg users can resolve most of the Gnome shell scaling problems by manually editing the shell theme that they are currently using. For example, the top of an edited CSS file for the Adapta shell theme might look like:.

Once these changes have been saved, activate them by switching to another theme for example, using gnome-tweaks and then reverting back again. The top bar, application menus, calendar, and other shell elements should now be correctly scaled. In addition to editing the relevant shell theme's CSS file, users on Xorg may also wish to increase the title bar font at the top of open applications.


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